Margot Robbie: ‘I asked my girlfriends what they’d been through. And they were angry’. – The Guardian

The actor talks to Tom Lamont about speaking out, hanging with the crew on set, and going from Neighbours to an Oscar nomination for I,Tonya

Nostalgic, nodding to herself, Margot Robbie walks around the deserted London bar a little in the manner of a soldier returning to the site of a heavy battle. A few years ago, when the Australian actor’s film career was getting going, when she was a Neighbours graduate who had been cast in a Martin Scorsese film, The Wolf Of Wall Street, Robbie lived nearby. The 27-year-old was one of a cluster of friends who squeezed into a rented home in Clapham meant for half that number, to save money. In the evenings, to stretch their limbs and get drunk, the gang would roll out to this bar.

“The best times,” says Robbie, remembering meandering conversations, in-jokes, budding love affairs and business decisions, big hangovers. The bar looks different at 10 in the morning, day-lit, set up for brunch. But, she remembers, there used to be a good sofa upstairs, past the table-football table, near the fireplace… “Here,” she says, pleased, settling in.

Robbie left London about a year ago, around the time she married her husband, Tom Ackerley, and moved to Los Angeles. She has flown back in to attend a screening of her new film, I, Tonya, ahead of its UK release. In a few hours she’ll be at a posh cinema, sitting in the dark and evaluating the audience’s every response. Robbie stars in this dark, low-budget comedy-biopic about the wayward American figure skater, Tonya Harding – and also produced it. This means having more skin in the game. It means “daily emails, saying what percentage we’re up or down in what cities, what demographics are responding in what way, what the reviews are saying”. Robbie collapses back on the sofa. “Super nerve-racking. Super exciting. I hadn’t been involved in this part before.”


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Margot Robbie Defends How ‘I, Tonya’ Depicts Domestic Abuse – New York Times

Margot Robbie adored the script for “I, Tonya,” the bonkers, ultimately dismaying film about the American figure skater Tonya Harding and the 1994 attack on rival skater Nancy Kerrigan.

But the actress feared no one would let her play the title role, not least because Ms. Robbie is Australian. “I always have impostor syndrome with any of my characters,” she told me in an interview at the Greenwich Hotel in Manhattan in late November. Ms. Robbie ended up serving as a producer of the picture and, of course, putting in a performance that earned her an Oscar nomination, her first, for best actress.

Ms. Robbie also shared her thoughts on the ’94 scandal and the criticism of the film’s depiction of domestic violence. Here are excerpts from our chat. [READ MORE]

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Margot Robbie talks playing Tonya Harding from 15 to 44 in I, Tonya.

Not only does Margot Robbie have the challenge of bringing to life notorious figure skater Tonya Harding in I, Tonya, but she also has to play her over a 29-year age span.

The film follows Harding from the age of three all the way through her forties, and Robbie plays her from 15-44.

“I’d never done that before. I mean, that’s a huge age span to jump between, especially when you’re doing an indie film you’re not shooting it chronologically,” she tells EW. “Some days I was 15 for the first half of the morning, then I’d be 23, then I’d be 40 and then back to 15, so it took a lot of prep to keep that straight. But it was a wonderful challenge because you get to map out someone’s character arc over decades and you can kind of see what was their childhood was like, how did that influence the person they then became, how did the incident and her fame, for good and bad, influence the person she then became in her 40s.”

Robbie, who received SAG and Golden Globe nominations for her performance and won the Critics Choice Award for Best Actress in a Comedy, says the script immediately pulled her in. “I was captivated. It was a bizarre, unconventional, crazy, fun, sad script and it felt very original. It was like nothing else I’d ever read before,” she says. “Of course once I realized it was a true story, I was definitely hooked.”

From there, Robbie says the challenge was overcoming people’s assumptions about Harding, particularly while playing her over a significant span of time. “How do you make people forget what they think they already know and just get lost in the story?” she asks.


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