Interview: Margot Robbie on Terminal’s bad reviews, #MeToo and cockney accent. – TASS

Margot Robbie

As Terminal is hitting screens in Russia and across the globe, TASS’ Dmitry Medvedenko speaks to Academy Award nominee Margot Robbie, the film’s star and producer, about what it’s like to do two jobs at a time, how titles get lost in translation, and how she feels about bad reviews and low scores.

– Terminal is coming to theaters across the globe, you filmed two years ago, and the world has somewhat changed over these two years, hasn’t it?

– Yes, definitely. At LuckyChap, our company, all of our films have a large female element to them, whether it’s a female-driven story because there’s a female protagonist, or written or directed by a female. Obviously, in the last just 8 months, after the #metoo and #timesup movement suddenly we had to look at our projects differently, and some suddenly felt even more relevant, while some felt less relevant. It’s a very big shift in the culture and in the industry, and it has kind of brought other things to the forefront of our minds. To reply to your question, Terminal, which had already been shot, it sadly and ironically feels more relevant now, releasing it at this time. It is a classic female revenge story.

– Yet the protagonist in Terminal has a very strong sexual power and vibe that she uses to drive the narrative forward.

– Yes. Vaughn [Stein], the director, and I talked a lot about how Annie has a whole dress-up box and how she can be a chameleon and transform herself into whatever she knows men want to see her as, whether it’s a sexy stripper or a kooky waitress or whatever – she understands the male gaze and knows how it shifts, so she can fulfill her plans where they’re not looking. It was very much a play on the classic film noir or femme fatale trope. And we kind of wanted to lean into that and subvert the tropes in some way.

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Margot Robbie on new Harley Quinn film, Tarantino and what made her love her ‘formal’ name. – USA Today

HOLLYWOOD – “Margot” seems too stuffy for Margot Robbie.

No offense to the fancy French Margots of the world, but Aussie actress Robbie, 27, is more exuberant than her name. Hours before the premiere of her new movie Terminal, she’s approachable in jeans and a T-shirt, and lights up when talking about her love of hockey, haunted houses and “any high-adrenaline activity,” as she says.

“I have such a weird, formal name,” the Oscar-nominated actress concedes. “It’s kind of like an old-lady name.”

Maybe she’s more of an Annie?

That’s the name of her mysterious protagonist in Terminal, a twisted neo-noir film that arrives Friday in theaters and on digital platforms such as iTunes and Amazon. The Vaughn Stein-directed movie was the first Robbie produced through her company, LuckyChap Entertainment. It was shot in 2016, back “when we had no idea what we were doing, to be honest,” she says, and before Robbie starred in and produced her acclaimed I, Tonya.

A lot has happened since: In 2017 alone, Robbie worked on five films.

So there was plenty to discuss when she sat down to chat with USA TODAY, including what made the star love her name and why she pushed for a female director on the forthcoming Harley Quinn film.

Question: Your Terminal character is given pet names “Bottled Blond” and “Sugarplum,” which she clearly doesn’t appreciate. Do you like nicknames?

Robbie: At school, I was called “Maggot,” which was horrible and so traumatic and a reason I despised my name. But now I love (my name because) my mom named me after a girl she grew up with.

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Margot on the Today Show and The Project while in Australia promoting “Peter Rabbit”.

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Margot back in Australia for the “Peter Rabbit” film premiere in Sydney.

Margot has come back to her homeland, this time for the Premiere of her other movie released this year, “Peter Rabbit”.

Photos from todays Premiere and yesterdays press day are added to the gallery!

This report from Dailymail.uk:

Margot Robbie has revealed she signed up for Peter Rabbit in the hopes that she would get a ‘free ticket home’.

But despite several live-action scenes being filmed in Sydney, the Oscar-nominated actress was told she’d be doing her parts in Los Angeles.

She told The Daily Telegraph on Saturday: ‘I’ve wanted to shoot something in Australia for so long, so I’m like, sign me up!’

‘Free ticket home, time with my family and then they were like, “Um, you’re actually going to do your parts in LA!” And I was like, No!’

Despite filming her scenes in the US, Margot was still pleased with how Peter Rabbit – which is based on the Beatrix Potter books – had a very Australian feel.

‘There is a lot of Australian pride connected with this film. Parts of it were shot in Australia (and) there are a lot of Australian cast members,’ she explained.

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For Margot Robbie and Allison Janney, personal versions of the truth play out in ‘I, Tonya’ – LA Times

“I, Tonya,” the Craig Gillespie-directed biopic about Tonya Harding, the figure skater banned from competition for life for her connection to a 1994 attack on fellow skater Nancy Kerrigan, has brought its stars — Margot Robbie, who plays an unsinkable Harding, and Allison Janney, as her sharp-tongued mother, LaVona — Oscar nominations, critical acclaim and, not surprisingly, a newfound love for the Winter Olympics. “We’re watching men’s half-pipe,” reports Robbie, jet-lagged and talking via speakerphone while sitting alongside Janney in a London hotel room. “We’re just mesmerized.”
The pair were in town to attend the BAFTAs, where they were both nominees. Before heading off to a party, they took time out to talk about the film’s more nuanced examination of Harding’s life (domestic violence, the skating world’s contempt for her working-class roots), Janney’s annoying parakeet costar and the reaction Robbie, an “I, Tonya” producer, had during her initial reading of Steven Rogers’ script.

“It’s so easy to dismiss these characters and their feelings. But by the end of it, I was devastated, angry and frustrated for them. I’d laugh out loud at something, then immediately feel disgusted with myself that I found it funny,” says Robbie. “To be able to let those feelings creep up on you, instead of being told to feel them? That’s a real art form.”

Parsing what’s true or false is a daily struggle of late. How much do you believe your characters?

Robbie: I knew we’d never know exactly how it went down. Twenty years later, everyone had completely different recollections of the same thing. Truth and reality had parted ways. My character’s truth was not necessarily the reality of the situation. But her version of the truth was far more interesting to me than the facts.
Janney: What made it so fun was the juxtaposition of everyone’s truth. You see LaVona throw a knife at her daughter, then cut to me saying, “What family doesn’t have their ups and downs?” Her truth was that she was a good mother, she gave her daughter an opportunity, and her daughter screwed it up by picking the [wrong] man. Where the reality is? I don’t know.

Read the rest of the interview [HERE]

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Margot Robbie on why women should stop apologising – Stylist

Nominated for an Oscar for her latest role as the controversial ice skater Tonya Harding, Margot Robbie talks to Stylist about refusing to toe the line.

In a gourmet bakery on LA’s La Brea Avenue, over a bowl of chia seeds and berries, Margot Robbie and I are comparing the size of our respective canines’ poo. (Hers is a petite rescue mutt named Boo Radley, mine a chihuahua mix.) “They are so small. Like, this big,” she says pointing to a raspberry, her grin nearing the width of the peak of her black nautical cap. “It’s so good.”


Robbie is the kind of Best Actress Academy Award nominee who can talk unflinchingly about dog poo despite the fact that, after her lead turn in black comedy I, Tonya, she is being considered among the best actors of her generation. She’s also president of her own production company, LuckyChap Entertainment (which she runs with four of her seven former south London flatmates, including her husband, Tom Ackerley). Sunny, quick-witted and unshowy, Robbie is, to coin a breakfast-related metaphor, a good egg.

A good egg but a badass: the 27-year-old thumped Leonardo DiCaprio in the face without warning in her audition for Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, her breakthrough role which came only a year after graduating from Neighbours in 2011. She does many of her own stunts, gave a speech at 2017’s Women in Hollywood Awards calling out the film industry’s propensity to see women “in the simplest terms and with the most convenient definitions”, and can trapeze and tattoo: she famously inked emojis on her 2016 Suicide Squad co-star Cara Delevingne’s toes. In short, Robbie seems to approach life as if she is leaping out of a plane to land feet-first on a bullseye. (She also skydives.)

Read whole interview [HERE]

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